The territory within the islands of the Four Kings is enormous, covering 9.8 million acres of land and sea, home to 540 types of corals, more than 1,000 different types of reef fish and 700 species of mollusk…  This makes it the most diverse living library for the planets coral reef and underwater biota…  According to a report developed by The Nature Conservancy and Conservation International, around 75% of the world's species reside here… When divers first arrive here their excitement is palpable…  It's common to hear people praise God as they take in the remarkable scenery…  Others prefer to remain in silence taking in the overwhelming sight of so many islands with crystal clear water that softly brushes over the white sandy beaches…

The four main islands of Misool, Batanta, Waigeo and Salawati, are in turn surrounded by approximately 1,500 wild islands with pristine beaches and sheer limestone cliffs plunging into aqua blue seas…

While the landscape may look like a dream, this is not an illusion…  As you embark on your dive, the phrase "attention to detail" takes on new meaning, as Pygmy Seahorses swim around your fingers…  Manta Rays and Wobbegong Sharks will glide right by you…  Tuna, Giant Trevally, Snapper, and flocks of Barracuda are abundant and complete your meeting list...

Not to mention, the friendly assistant of the Dugong, and a busy colleague, with six of the earth’s seven species of Sea Turtle…  Natural and untouched beauty is the main attraction here... With no unnecessary adages, the sky, the lush islands, the sea, and everything above and under it is genuinely saying "Welcome to the Raja Ampat Islands, your personal Disneyland of diving sites"…

In 2006, 50 new species were discovered on a researcher’s trip to the Bird’s Head Peninsula region, and every year fascinating and previously unrecorded creatures are discovered here…

Above water, the islands cultural heritage is diverse, with prehistoric cave paintings and relics from the era of the Four Kings who once ruled here, while more recent history is demonstrated in cave bunkers and seabed wreckage from World War II…  Intrepid visitors can trek through the jungle, learn about traditional kampung life in local villages, visit sea turtle rookeries and pearl farms and explore the coastal mangroves by sea kayak...  Resounding with bird calls, the Raja Ampat archipelago houses the largest number of freshwater bird species in the region, Parrots, Hornbills, Lorikeets, Marbled Frogmouths and the famous Bird of Paradise to name a few…

Raja Ampat remains one of the last untouched corners of the earth, and makes for a magical trip for anyone looking to get away from the daily grind and relax in a naturally beautiful environment…

Raja Ampat is best visited between November and April…